niggaclouds:

pbh3:

The planets, aligned.

the sickest thing ive ever seen

(Source: jonyorkblog, via hahahadas)

Lux. (at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens)

Lux. (at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens)

ohstarstuff:

What You Need to Know About Mars Comet Siding Spring

  • On Sunday, October 19th, Comet C/2013 A1, aka Siding Spring, will pass within about 87,000 miles of the Red Planet.
  • The distance the comet will be from Mars is less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth.
  • Siding Spring, whose core is 0.5 to 5 miles (0.8 to 8 kilometers) wide, probably formed somewhere between Jupiter and Neptune about 4.6 billion years ago — just a few million years after the solar system began coming together. Scientists believe Siding Spring had a close encounter with one of these planets and was booted out into the Oort Cloud
  • A million years ago or so, a star passing by the Oort Cloud is thought to have jolted the comet’s orbit again, sending it on its first-ever trip into the inner solar system.
  • Siding Spring has never been “heat-treated” by the sun before, it’s a pristine object that looks much the same today as it did 4.6 billion years ago.
  • Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere.
  • NASA does not think the comet hit the Red Planet, but comets spew out a trail of dust and gas, and that could damage the fleet of spacecraft orbiting Mars. Just to be safe, NASA will move the Mars Odyssey orbiter, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and the new Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) to the other side of the planet as the comet approaches.
  • The Mars orbiters will take pictures and collect data on the comet as it zips by. Several Earth-based and space telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope, also will take pictures. Full list of NASA assets observing Siding Spring
  • The comet was first discovered in January 2013 by Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.
  • Great article from Space.com on how to view the comet from Earth 

(Source: mars.nasa.gov)

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Fade Into Darkness
A manta ray emerges from the deep.
Photo by Drew Senter; Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Fade Into Darkness

A manta ray emerges from the deep.

Photo by Drew Senter; Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

thingsorganizedneatly:

SUBMISSION:  white oak leaves in autumn (at stillblog.net by mary jo hoffman)

thingsorganizedneatly:

SUBMISSION:  white oak leaves in autumn (at stillblog.net by mary jo hoffman)

thepoeticunderground:

"Standing Still"
October 16th 2014

thepoeticunderground:

"Standing Still"

October 16th 2014

Scientifically accurate.

Scientifically accurate.

"There is a kind of lingering snobbery in the literary world that wants to exclude nonfiction from the classification of literature—to suggest that somehow it lacks artistry, or imagination, or invention by comparison to fiction. The mentality is akin to the prejudice that long held photography at bay in the visual-art world."

Philip Gourevitch on why nonfiction deserves a Nobel (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

ohstarstuff:

You couldn’t be here without the material created from stars that exploded eons ago. The carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution come from these violent processes. We are all precious and unique down to the very stars we’re made of.

ohstarstuff:

You couldn’t be here without the material created from stars that exploded eons ago. The carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution come from these violent processes. We are all precious and unique down to the very stars we’re made of.

"Nobel Prizes are not awarded because researchers figured out how to make a lot of money. They are awarded because researchers transformed, at some level, our understanding of the human experience, and all that goes on in the universe that we call home."

University of California President Janet Napolitano discussing the importance of basic research.

Listen to her talk here →

(via ucresearch)